A Kingdom of the Vertical

I am reading Jules Verne's 20,000 Leagues under the Sea (1869) - a depth which incidentally far exceeds any that actually exists but refers if translated correctly from the French - sea becomes seas - to the overall distance travelled by the Nautilus submarine.

In Chapters 16 and 17, A Stroll on the Ocean Bed and A Submarine Forest a hunt takes place on the seabed.

Verne describes a number of phenomena: the passage of light and sound through water, the shooting of an albatross from underwater, the sensation of seeing ones own inverted reflection overhead, mimicking every move; the passage of waves from below; which conjure up a world in which the familiar is strangely displaced and distorted. In one section he echoes Bramley’s observations about gravity (see Talk posting) describing plants whose attachment to the seabed amounts to nothing more than the most tenuous of balancing points, the boughs of which grow uncompromisingly upright, un-impinged by the pull of either gravity or wind – ‘a kingdom of the vertical’