Optics

The Submersion Series

  • Dartington
  • Atami - Turkey
  • Piscina Coperta
  • Hornsey Road
  • Marshall St
  • Banff - Nightpool
  • Images
  • Banff - Storms
  • Pilangsbadet
The Submersion Series

the submersion series is a series of works related to swimming pools that I have been working on for a number of years. I am especially interested in the play of safety and danger with which they are charged.

Rather than in social histories of swimming, public health or leisure, I am drawn to the spatial and symbolic properties of pools and the psychological resonances to which these give rise.


Truthing Gap: Photos

Banff

  • Banff - Storms
  • Banff - Nightpool
  • The Submersion Series
Banff

These images were made in 2007 during a residency on the theme of 'imaginary Places' at Banff Arts Centre, Canada. They are primarily concerned with the ambiguous nature of the water's surface.

As compared to the first set of images in the submersion series - shot at Tair Lair tidal pool in Scotland - in which a female figure offers a counterpoint to the landscape, suggestive of an interior space, here the body of the viewer provides an echo for the emptiness of the pool.


Banff: Banff - Storms

Banff: Banff - Nightpool

Mean of the earth

Tim continues teaching the 3D modelling software he uses. Today our source was a bathythemetic map of the world. While showing me various functions he pointed out that the programme had calculated that in approximate terms the mean height / depth - depending on how you view it - of the Earth's surface is 1424 metres below sea level!

A statistic which for a moment held us both rapt, bringing home afresh the extent to which the sea, rather than earth, dominates the surface of the planet.

The most common height above sea level is 85 metres and the least 3,3800 metres below.

The Encircling of a Shadow

  • Performance
  • Gallery
  • Video
The Encircling of a Shadow

Commissioned and Exhibited: Newlyn Art Gallery, Cornwall. 2001


Breaking the surface

  • Images
Breaking the surface

Commissioned: Hull Time Based Arts. Exhibited: William Wilberforce Museum, Hull. 2002

Made up of forty separate electron miroscope scans (at a magnification of 200 x) of the inside of a pearl revealing the speck of dirt which had caused the oyster to generate it.


s[H]elf I

s[H]elf I
Commissioned: Performulate. Exhibited: Cambridge Darkroom 1998

s[H]elf II

s[H]elf II
Residency and Exhibition: La Chambre Blanche, Quebec City, Canda. 1999

Hidden Seas/ Surface Waters

  • Video
Hidden Seas/ Surface Waters
Performance for camera, 1999 - Duration 11 minutes

Drawing on family experience of physical disability Hidden Seas / Surface Waters attempted to articulate a body of difference, whose boundaries remain physiologically and psychologically fluid, inverting the characteristic function of light as a source of 'illumination'.

The use of silhouettes within the work references the 18th century physiognomic experiments of James Lavater, who attempted to read from the profile of his sitters their moral and spiritual 'nature'.

Supported by a London Arts Board - London Hybrids Research and Development Award.

Production support Irish Museum of Modern Art and Arthouse, Dublin.
Residency and screening: Irish Musueum of Modern Art, Dublin. 1999
Exhibited, Spacex, Exeter. 2003

Forensic

Forensic
Exhibited: Museum of Installation, London. 2000

Reasoning Backwards

Reasoning Backwards
Exhibited: Dartington Arts Devon 2000

Truthing Gap: MAPPING exhibition  (Nov 13th - Dec 11th 09)

A series of works in progress, generated at the National Oceanography Centre, as Leverhulme Artist in Residence, exhibited as part of a group show on Mapping at Howard Gardens Gallery, University of Wales Institute. 

Each marks an attempt to engage with processes of representing the undersea world while providing a counterpoint to the virtual and optical emphasis of scientific methods. Seeking ways of 'knowing', centred upon the imagination, desire, the body and touch, capable of resisting the separation of subject and object demanded by the use of observation as a way of encountering the world.